ART OF SCRUM: Process Makes Perfect, Part I

Posted: January 29, 2008 in Art of Scrum
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Scrum is really fond of recoiling at anything that vaguely resembles Waterfall methodology, but after a while, this provokes the following question: How do you balance Agility and Process? By definition, [Business] Process means following established procedures, usually in a certain order. This is already starting to quack like a duck in a Waterfall to Scrum aficionados.

On the other hand, it is patently stupid to be Agile for the sake of saying that you are being Agile. That is like pretending that there is a hopscotch board in front of you wherever you need to walk. Entertaining for a little while? Perhaps; however, over time, you will not only expend a lot of unnecessary effort, you will look foolish. Scrum, XP, Lean Development, and other Agile methodologies are, well, methodologies, and as such, are processes. Although clever witticisms such as “Scrum: it depends on common sense (Danube Training)” and “Scrum is not a methodology — it’s a pathway (Ken Schwaber)” are helpful when in the context of the tapestry that they pertain to, lifting them out as sound bites will insure that they are used in the wrong circumstances to justify incorrect assumptions.

So, back to my Blog title: Process Makes Perfect. I am not quacking here; even Agile PM has procedures to insure results. The introduction of Agility to a company is always tough because it forces the employees at all levels to think sideways, not completely out of the box. No Agile screed that I have ever heard of asks an enterprise to jettison everything in the name of Agility; rather, it is learning to recognize that you have many more options besides ludicrous speed and ranking full stop.

If you look at all of the fancy diagrams that supposedly depict Scrum processes with 3D delivery time loops, poetry and Bible verses, and even BHAG flowcharts, they really all say the same thing:

Wait for it…

Think Different

OK, I am not joining the ranks of the Apple fanatics (NSFW) here at Achieve with this bold appropriation of their late 90’s advertising campaign. It just so happens that this describes Agile thinking very, very well…when it is paired with a standard process to follow.

Nobody complains about the Waterfall when it is producing quality software, meeting deadlines, communicating well, and insuring that clients feel like heroes. No one cares how Agile your company is if you deliver a shoddy product that the customer didn’t ask for, late and over budget. There is a balance that can be struck — and should be found — where the best practices of differing methodologies can actually provide better results than any one on its own.

If a process is a series of steps in a predictable order, such as points on a straight line, then agility is thinking multidimensionally: away from the line. The main cause of grief from Waterfall is the strict adherence to the idea that “we can’t do that until we have done this”. This dot is in front of that dot on the line, and you cannot think differently enough to see that there is more than one dimension. Agile methodologies encourage anyone who is familiar with this mode of thinking to do a sort of mental Aikido when the standard operating procedures meet with resistance or raised impediments:

Aikido techniques are normally performed after first blending with the motion of the attacker, so that the defender may redirect the attacker's momentum without directly opposing it, thus using minimum effort...Aikido demonstrates this philosophy in its emphasis on mastering martial arts so that one may receive an attack and harmlessly redirect it. In an ideal resolution, not only is the receiver unharmed, but so is the attacker.

If the process is running smoothly, and product (quality “potentially shippable” code) is being generated, there is no real problem. It is when one perfectly-shaped piece of gravel catches your left front skateboard wheel at high speed that you realize that the attack is imminent — in this metaphor, the asphalt meeting the side of your face. Being flexible in your processes not only allows for agility, but brings you closer to not only dealing with your “attacker” (WIBNI, anyone?) but finding an ideal resolution to the apparent confrontation.

Here is some more abuse of the code block tags; something else to pair up with this idea of an Agile process, this time from the buzzword bingo that is the Agile Manifesto:

Simplicity--the art of maximizing the amount of work not done--is essential

As I have stated before, Achieve has an Approach. This is where I am going with my defense of Process. Recent hard work has determined that we may have found a balance point between Scrum and Process that will provide the Company with the best of both worlds.

Stay tuned for the other side of the double-wide!

Comments
  1. […] results, it is — but that is not the point. The point of Scrum is to force participants to think outside the box and provide continuous feedback on specific deliveries to insure that nobody is working in a […]

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